Paul W Sullivan & Assoc

Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 3/18/2018

If you are in the market for an FHA loan, you are probably happy to get many benefits from the loan like a good interest rate along with the need for a low downpayment. While these loans can be very helpful on the path to homeownership, they can be complex. It’s a good idea to hire a realtor who is well-versed in the ins and outs of FHA loans and standards. A real estate agent can help you to find the right property to suit your needs and meet the standards the FHA loan will require.    

Do you know what you’re getting into when it comes to shopping for a home? The FHA sets the rules for how homes get approved for an FHA loan and under what standards. These rules exist because the FHA is insuring the loan, but the organization is not directly funding the loan itself. This insurance protects the lender if the loan is defaulted on. An inspection appraisal report must be completed on each property. The appraiser is required to be an FHA approved appraiser to complete the job.


There are limits on how much of a loan you can get when it is FHA-backed. This is because the FHA will only insure a loan amount up to this limit. This means that you won’t be looking at high-end homes because the limits are usually quite restrictive as to the type of property you can get. This holds true unless you can afford a larger downpayment than the standard 3.5% required by the FHA.  

Condition Of The Home

FHA-backed home loans can be rejected due to the poor condition of the home. If an appraiser says that the home is unsafe or hazardous to occupants, the loan will be denied. The assessment of the home’s condition is very important to the lender’s decision to grant the loan. The lender may even require that certain improvements be made before the loan can be approved. These improvements can include pest treatments, fixing leaks, or other damages that are deemed hazardous.

The Property Itself

The FHA also sets guidelines for the type of property that you can get. A condo must be in a HUD approved complex, for example. If you want to research FHA-approved condo complexes, you can search right on the HUD website. Each complex meets the Department of Housing And Urban Development’s standards for financial stability, hazard, and liability insurance. If you’re looking at manufactured homes, these are also held to certain standards. The manufactured home must be permanently attached to the foundation, have the ability to be taxed as a real estate property asset, and have been constructed before June 15, 1976.   

Tags: Buying a home   FHA loans  
Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 3/16/2018

70 Scarsdale Road , Dennis, MA 02638

Dennis (village)



Total Rooms
Full/Half Baths
Quaint and charming Cape North of 6A overlooking a beautiful cranberry bog. Built in 1986, but renovated several times over the years. A first floor master bedroom & bath suite was just added in 2017. The home is warm and comfortable with a traditional floor plan featuring molded ceilings, maple flooring, dining rm with slider to patio, large working kitchen with stone countertops, and cathedral ceiling foyer. The lower level is finished with two large rooms and a full bath. All it needs is some finished flooring, it's a great overflow space with slider to lower patio. Lots of yard space and easy access to all village activities. Walkable to Corporation beach.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

Similar Properties

Categories: New Homes  

Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 3/11/2018

Selling your home may prove to be a long, arduous process, particularly if you're unable to distinguish your residence from others on the housing market. Fortunately, there are many great household items that you can leave behind to differentiate your home from others and improve your chances of a quick sale.

Leaving various household items behind can serve you well in a number of ways. First, you'll be able to give homebuyers an incentive to purchase your residence if you leave custom or high-priced items that they might struggle to purchase elsewhere. You also will be able to simplify the moving process, as you won't have to worry about relocating numerous items that you leave behind when you move out of your current home.

There are many wonderful items that you can leave behind to boost your chances of a quick home sale, including:

1. Refrigerator

If your refrigerator complements your kitchen décor beautifully, it may enhance the appearance of your kitchen. Plus, this appliance could become a key component in a negotiation with a homebuyer that may make it easier for you to maximize the value of your residence.

Your refrigerator may have served you well for years, but you won't have to worry about investing substantial time and resources to move it to your new address if you leave this appliance behind. Also, if you offer your refrigerator as part of your home purchase, it may prove to be the difference between selling your home and keeping it on the real estate market for an extended period of time.

2. Big-Screen TV

The big-screen TV in your den, man cave or living room has helped transformed your ordinary living space into a fun, exciting area. Now, you'll want to consider including your big-screen TV in your home sale, as this could help you streamline the process of selling your house.

By offering your big-screen TV, you'll make it easy for a homebuyer to move in and enjoy a high-quality TV instantly. Furthermore, the big-screen TV may help a homebuyer save time and money, as he or she won't have to worry about finding a new television after purchasing your residence.

3. Washer or Dryer

Let's face it – un-installing and relocating a washer or dryer can be a time-consuming endeavor. And in some cases, you may even need to hire a plumber to perform this task properly.

Lucky for you, leaving your washer or dryer behind could prove to be mutually beneficial for you and a homebuyer.

As a home seller, you won't have to worry about allocating time and resources to move a large, heavy washer or dryer from your residence. For a homebuyer, he or she will be able to reap the benefits of a superior washer or dryer immediately.

Consider the household items that you'll leave behind before you add your house to the real estate market. By doing so, you can include these items in your home listing and improve your chances of selling your house quickly.

Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 3/4/2018

When it comes to finding a place for you and your family to live, there have never been more options available than today. Banks and property owners have made living arrangements available and accessible to people of any lifestyle; whether you plan on staying in a home for just six months, or for the rest of your life.

It isn’t always easy, though, to determine which option is best for you. In this article, we’ll break down the financial and lifestyle characteristics of the four most common living situations: condominiums, townhouses, apartments, or owning your own home.

Condo living

Condominiums are a type of community living. But, they’re more than just an apartment that you own. Most condos are attached; meaning they’re not separated by yards and driveways. Some, however, are detached. One thing that is true for all condos, however, are the common areas throughout the development. This can include things like a park, yards, gyms, pools, or lounges and cafes. The best part about those amenities? You don’t have to worry about their upkeep.

So, since you own the condo, who pays for the common areas? Odds are, you’ll be paying a monthly fee or a homeowners association fee to upkeep the amenities your condo came with. Expect higher fees for better amenities and prime real estate location.

What about maintenance? Since you own the condo, you’re responsible for much of the interior maintenance, such as appliances. However, outdoor issues like roofing or siding are usually the responsibility of the homeowners association or property manager.

Condos are ideal for people who are somewhat committed to an area, and who want independence over their home without having to take care of all the landscaping.


Townhouses are in many ways the opposite of condos. They are often rented but they look like single family homes, complete with a driveway and front yard. There are also typically homeowners association fees for townhouses, but they can be significantly less since there are fewer amenities in a townhouse living environment.

Depending on your long-term plans, you can either rent or buy townhouses. Renting is usually a better choice for inhabitants who don’t plan on staying in the residence for more than a couple of years.


If what you truly seek in a home is independence and privacy then traditional homeownership might be the best option for you. If you own a home outright and don’t have to answer to a homeowners association, you get to choose what you do with your yard. There are of course, some limits to this, like getting additions approved by zoning boards, or trampolines signed off by your insurance company.

Financially, homes can be a good asset. They typically increase in value and allow you to build equity. You might also find them more financially dependable; rents can increase year after year, but your monthly mortgage payments typically won’t unless you choose to refinance.

Ultimately, buying a home is going to benefit you more the longer you stay there. So, if you plan on moving for work in the next few years, you might be better off renting.

Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 2/25/2018

If you're getting ready to put your house on the market, your real estate agent will create a focused marketing plan that will help attract interested prospects to your home. Although your agent will tap into a variety of resources to make it widely known that your house is for sale, there's information you can provide which will help them present it in its best possible light. Specifically, I'm talking about the things that make prospective buyers perk up, such as HVAC system upgrades, major home improvements, and decorating updates. If you've kept good records about rooms you've remodeled, fixtures you've replaced, and any structural, cosmetic, or mechanical upgrades you've made over the years, it would be helpful to itemize those improvements and share them with your Realtor or real estate agent. Unless your home was newly constructed when you bought it, chances are you've made numerous changes. Here are examples of some of the types of information you'll want to pass along to your agent:

  • The age of the roof: There are a lot of variables, when it comes to the life expectancy of roofing materials. With harsh weather conditions -- including sweltering summer days and annual ice buildups -- Mother Nature subjects your roof to a lot of wear and tear. If it's been more than 20 years since your roof was last replaced, the shingles are probably starting to show visible signs of deterioration. That's definitely not a selling point for prospective buyers. What house hunters do love to hear is that the roof is relatively new and has been replaced within the past five years. Although prices vary and can run higher, roofs typically cost at least $10,000 to replace. Many potential buyers would be turned off by the prospect of having to shell out that kind of money after they close on the house. Others might use that as a bargaining chip to get you to lower your asking price. In either case, an old roof puts you at a disadvantage.
  • Completed remodeling projects: Although some home buyers thrive on the idea of renovating a property themselves, most would prefer an updated home. Recently remodeled bathrooms and kitchens will make your house much more appealing and marketable to would-be buyers. If those closely scrutinized rooms look dated or poorly maintained, you can be sure that will negatively impact the selling price and/or the amount of time your house stays on the market.
  • Mechanical and electrical upgrades: People like to hear about improvements like a new central air conditioning system, a furnace replacement, or an upgraded electrical panel. These can all be major selling points, especially among prospective buyers who have had trouble with any of these vital systems in the past.
  • Miscellaneous: Other features that could help sell your house may include energy-efficient windows, new flooring, lighting, security systems, room additions, a new driveway or walkways, a finished basement or attic, basement waterproofing, new siding, fencing, patios, porches, and landscaping improvements.
While this is not a comprehensive list of all the home improvements you'll want to share with your real estate agent, it includes many of the key items that will be on the minds of prospective buyers.