Paul W Sullivan & Assoc



Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 4/28/2019

More and more frequently, travelers see animals on board airplanes—in the cabin, rather than as special cargo. According to the Air Carrier Access Act, a service animal is: “any animal that is individually trained or able to provide assistance to a person with a disability; or any animal that assists persons with disability by providing emotional support.”

Which animals qualify?

Service animals and emotional support animals, not pets, must fit the description of an animal which, as determined by a qualified medical professional, provides individuals with a benefit to a physical or emotional disorder. Benefits of emotional support animals might include keeping the individual calm or providing relief from anxiety during travel. 

Service animals, such as guide dogs for the blind, or those trained in medical detection for a pending epileptic seizure have more specific benefits, but emotional support animals range from a wide variety that includes dogs, cats, birds, miniature pigs, lizards, and even kangaroos.

The difficulty for airlines is determining which animals are for emotional support and which are merely a pet. While each airline determines its own qualifications, the Act allows airlines to prohibit any animals already banned from entering a foreign country where the flight terminates. Also prohibited is any animal that is too heavy or a size that cannot be accommodated safely in the cabin, any animals that pose a threat to the health or safety of other passengers, and those that might be disruptive to the flight. Airlines flying to and from the United States are only required to accept dogs as service animals.

Airlines may reject reptiles (including snakes), rodents, ferrets, spiders, and sugar gliders at any time.

Is documentation required?

While requirements for each airline may differ, in general, airlines may require any of the following:

  • A current (within one year) document indicating that the passenger has an emotional disability recognized by the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders); and
  • That the passenger needs the animal for emotional support;
  • The provider of the document is a licensed medical or mental health professional;
  • The jurisdiction of the medical professional, and the issue date of their license.

Airline employees may determine the validity of a service animal via verbal assurance, physical indicators such as tags and harnesses, or requiring documentation. Before assuming an emotional-support animal may board with you, check with your airline(s) since some request a 48-hour advanced notice to accommodate your animal.

If you're moving to a new city and need to transport your pets, do not assume they can board the aircraft with you. Ask your local real estate agent to help you locate a certified pet transport service to bring your pet safely to your new home.




Tags: moving tips   pets   animals  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 9/2/2018

Moving day is likely the most stressful day of the home-buying process. With so many items to keep track of, not to mention kids and pets, it can be easy to get overwhelmed during the process. To make matters worse, sometimes the items to so carefully pack are damaged during the move, or while unpacking at your new home.

In this article, we’re going to attempt to alleviate some of that moving day stress by giving you expert advice on how to avoid damaging your belongings during a move, and what to do if damage does occur.

What items are prone to damage?

Some items need to be handled with extra care while packing and while moving. Those items include:

  • Glasses, plates, and other fragile kitchenware

  • Electronics, especially those with display screens like televisions, tablets, or digital photo frames

  • Mirrors and glass decoratives

  • Anything containing liquid--this could be shampoo, cleaning supplies, wine or alcohol bottles, and so on. These are of particular importance because if they leak they can damage other items, not to mention require a cleanup that you don’t have time for

Packing to avoid damage

There are a few things you can do while packing and securing your boxes to avoid damage during a move. We’ve outlined some important packing tips below:

  • Buy bright red fragile stickers and use them appropriately. Putting a fragile sticker on every box is no use, because you’ll need to know while ones shouldn’t be stacked high or left in insecure places in the moving van.

  • For fragile items like glasses and plates, wrap them several times in packing paper, and put them in a double-thick packing box. When you fill the box, avoid leaving too much empty space but also be careful not to pack too much inside. This will put excessive pressure on the fragile items inside.

  • For liquid items, check that caps are all screwed on tightly. Then place them inside of ziploc bags if you’re able. If not, putting them inside a plastic grocery bag and typing the top should be sufficient enough if a small leak occurs from one of the bottles.

Securing items in the moving truck

When it comes to stacking your boxes in the moving truck, put the heaviest, largest, and least-fragile boxes in the truck first. Use straps and bungee cords to keep items grouped together and avoid having boxes or other items tip over. Think of filling the truck like a game of Tetris- the better the items fit together, the less likely they are of falling.

What to do if your items are damaged

First of all, make sure to read the contract with your moving company and to purchase insurance. Then, take photos of your fragile and valuable items to that you can prove they weren’t damaged before the move.

If something is damaged, take a photo of it right away and request the paperwork required to file a complaint with the moving company. If they ignore your request, you may choose to file a formal complaint with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration on their website




Tags: moving tips   moving   movers  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 8/12/2018

Moving day; you’ve waited months for this day to arrive, working hard to make sure you, your family, pets, and belongings are ready for the big move.

With all of the preparations and various people involved, it’s easy for moving day to become dangerous.

To ensure that you and your family have a safe and smooth moving day, I’ve provided some tips that every mover should keep in mind.

Make plans for pets and young children

The last thing you want on the first day in your new home is to be wandering around the neighborhood looking for your dog who slipped away during the move. If possible, make arrangements for pets to stay with friends or family for moving day to make things easier.

If you need to bring your pets along, it’s a good idea to put them in a “playroom” with their toys, water bowl, etc. while you have the door to the house open. Not only will it stop them from running out, but it will also prevent you from tripping over them while you carry the couch.

Don’t be a hero

It’s our tendency to want to do a job ourselves if we want it done right. But, when it comes to moving, that philosophy can lead to a thrown out back and a damper on your plans.

When it comes to getting large and heavy objects in and out of the house, make sure you have at least one other person ready to lift with you.

Stack from heaviest to lightest

It may seem obvious, but in the confusion of a move, it can be easy to pack your truck or van in a less-than-ideal way. Rather than playing Tetris with your boxes, try to focus on weight instead. You don’t want heavy boxes near the roof in case they fall on you or on your other belongings.

Place the largest and heavier items in the van first. This will allow you to plan the rest of the load around them, rather than having to move them around to make room.

Take a breather

As tempting as it may be, you don’t have to finish everything in one day. As long as your truck is locked and secure, it’s okay if you don’t bring in every single box. Resting throughout the day and staying hydrated, especially when moving in the summer, will help you stay sharp and ready to keep working.

Have an emergency plan

If you take precautions, you most likely won’t have to worry about emergencies. However, accidents do happen and it’s best to be prepared for them when they do. If you or a family member requires medication, make sure it’s handy and that everyone knows where it is.

Similarly, label your first aid kit and keep it with your necessities during the move.


If you follow these tips, your moving day should be a simple and safe process and you’ll be enjoying your new home in no time.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 3/25/2018

Getting a cat, dog or other pets ready for an upcoming move sometimes can be tricky. Fortunately, we're here to help you and your pet enjoy a quick, seamless transition to a new address.

Now, let's take a look at three moving tips that every pet owner needs to know.

1. Prepare Your Pet's Records

If you're moving far away from your current address, you likely will need to find a new veterinarian in the near future. As such, it pays to prepare your pet's records today to avoid potential problems down the line.

Ask your current veterinarian for a copy of your pet's records. By doing so, you'll have these records readily available for your new veterinarian once you reach your new address.

2. Help Your Pet Manage Stress

Moving is stressful, even for a pet. However, there are many simple ways to help your pet alleviate stress throughout the moving process.

For example, keeping your pet away from movers may prove to be exceedingly valuable. If a pet sees familiar furniture and other items leaving your home, he or she may start to feel worried. On the other hand, spending extra time with your pet while movers pick up your belongings may help you pet minimize stress on moving day.

3. Protect Your Pet While Traveling

Keep your pet in a crate while you're driving to your new home – you'll be glad you did. It is unsafe for your pet to roam free in your car, especially if you're going to be on the road for several hours. Conversely, if you keep your pet in a crate, you'll help him or her remain safe for the duration of your journey.

If you are traveling by airplane, ensure your pet has met all necessary airline requirements. In addition, pick up a pet crate and consult with a veterinarian before your flight.

For those who need extra assistance with navigating the moving process, it often helps to work with a real estate agent. In fact, this housing market professional can help you and your pet overcome myriad moving day pitfalls.

A real estate agent can offer expert insights into what it takes to move with a pet. He or she also can provide comprehensive support as you prepare for a move and respond to any moving day concerns or questions that you may have.

Of course, a real estate agent can help you buy or sell a house as well. For homebuyers, a real estate agent can provide details about homes located near dog parks and other pet-friendly venues. Meanwhile, for home sellers, a real estate agent will make it easy to generate plenty of interest in your house so that you can get the best price for it.

Are you and your pet ready to move? Use the aforementioned moving tips, and you and your pet should have no trouble completing a successful relocation.




Tags: moving tips   pets   pet safety  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Paul W Sullivan & Assoc on 1/21/2018

Moving is a big adjustment for any of us, yet it can be hardest on the children in our lives. Moving can mean a new school for your kids and a whole lot of unfamiliar faces. There are a few ways that you can help kids adjust to the change of moving to a new place and help them to feel at home faster. 


Let Them Be Involved With The New House


As a child, it can seem like moving into a new house is all about adults. Kids may feel that they’re merely along for the ride. You can let the kids pick out some things in the house. What color should their room be? Can the kids give some input on a new piece of furniture? Make moving a family affair and allow everyone in the family to feel included to make the transition smoother. 


Get Enrolled In Local Activities


See what types of local activities are available for the kids (and you) to be enrolled in. From tennis lessons to summer camp to after school activities, there’s plenty of things in a community that you and your family can get involved in. If you can find an activity to participate in with your kids, it will only make it easier for them to feel comfortable meeting other kids. You can also get acquainted with other adults to get some more information and insight about your new community. Making new friends and doing something they love will help your kids to feel right at home. The kids will feel more comfortable i their new school as well if they get involved.  



Help Kids Stay In Touch With Old Friends


Moving isn’t all about making new friends. Kids can still keep in touch with their old friends. If you didn’t move very far away, schedule dates for your kids to meet up with their old friends. If you have moved across states, encourage your kids to keep in touch with old friends through phone calls and video chat meetings. They’ll know that someday, they’ll see each other in person again. These actions can help in the transition of moving as well, since kids will see that their old lives have not been completely lost and forgotten about.


Stroll Around The Neighborhood As A Family


One great way to get adjusted to a new neighborhood is to explore it by foot. Make it a point to take an evening stroll as a family. The kids can learn a bit more about the area and begin to feel more comfortable in their surroundings with your help. You’ll also make discoveries about your new surroundings as a family.




Tags: Buying a home   moving tips   kids  
Categories: Uncategorized  




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